Conclusion

Conclusion

Today, people today live in an ‘era of experiences’ with high expectations (Davison in Spector, 2017).  Employers seek creative, collaborative employees and this drives the need for flexible, adaptable physical spaces (Oradini et al., 2019).  Design Thinking provides the framework for user-centred, learning-focused innovative solutions to re-designing Library Area 3.  Feedback is sought from users throughout the design process and evaluation of data allows designers to assess the intended and unintended outcomes of the space.  The advantage of the iterative, cyclical nature of Design Thinking means that it is possible to ‘loop back’ to the earlier phases and reconsider the design if necessary (Gibbons, 2016).  The proposed learning space design for Area 3 was created in response to the iterative dialogue between stakeholders resulting in a space which is flexible, adaptable, inclusive, sustainable and provides varied opportunities for collaboration in formal and informal learning environments.  In order to mitigate the risk that teaching staff will not embrace the teaching and learning opportunities of the new space, staff development is necessary because design itself does not guarantee success.

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